On The Boards: Arielle Condoret Schechter Designs Modern Cliff-Hanger in Western North Carolina

April 20, 2022 § Leave a comment

Rendering of the Miller-McWeeney house, Northside

Calling the site for this project “one of the tightest little corners I’ve ever had to make something fit,” Chapel Hill architect Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA, has designed a modern, sustainable home on a mountainside in Swannanoa, NC, a tiny township between Asheville and Black Mountain, NC.

Designed for P.J. Miller, a musician, and artist Katie McWeeney, the two-story, modern, thoroughly “green” house will hug the flat part of the couple’s cliff-side property and include three bedrooms, two baths, an open kitchen/dining/living core, two studios/workspaces, two carports, and abundant decking for outdoor living and connectivity between the indoors and outdoors.

Chief among Schechter’s inspirations for this design was the couple’s lament over never having enough kitchen, workspace, or studio space in previous homes. “We’re trying to remedy that in this house,” she said, accepting the challenge despite the restrictive size of the property’s buildable area.

Rendering, Miller-McWeeney house, Southwest Elevation

Actually, the site’s verticality helped her solve the studio/workspace problem. She’s tucked two studios beneath the living spaces, along with carports/loading zones on each end. The loading zones will create sightlines and open-air spaces within the entire volume, she pointed out, “and create the sort of positive-negative composition I like.”

Along with art and music, Miller and McSweeney enjoy cooking, baking, and hosting cooking classes. To enhance their passion, the Schechter-designed kitchen will provide a profusion of natural lighting along with an open, professionally planned interior.

Will the Miller-McWeeney home contribute to Schechter’s ever-expanding portfolio of net-zero residential designs?

“Yes, of course,” she said emphatically. “Our goal for all our houses is to be net-zero, net-positive or, at the very least, net-zero-ready.” The latter means that the completed house will be wired and plumbed for solar panels to be installed in the future. “That, plus rooftop water collection for gardening should make this a very sustainable house for this great couple to enjoy.”

For more information on the architect and her work, visit acsarchitect.com.

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HOME BUILDER DIGEST: “The 18 Best Residential Architects in North Carolina”

February 8, 2022 § Leave a comment

North Carolina is one of the most popular states to live in the country. The “Triangle” region of the state, which includes Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill, provides visitors and residents with a myriad of reasons to enjoy the state. It has a diverse culture, rich history, and a wide array of job opportunities. Scenic mountain vistas, pristine beaches, and fantastic weather make it a thriving area. 

The state is home to vibrant communities filled with adventures. With a population of over ten million people, North Carolina is the ninth biggest state in the country, and it is still growing. For those considering relocating to the region and those seeking to upgrade their North Carolina homes, the best residential architects are necessary. 

The list below showcases the best residential architects in North Carolina. These firms were selected based on their experiences in residential designs, awards won, years in the industry, and media coverage, and they are the best in the industry…

Arielle Condoret Schechter, Architect

A fine example of the firm’s accomplished projects is Wolf-Huang Residence on Lake Orange. Photo by Tzu Chen.

What separates multi-award-winning firm Arielle Condoret Schechter, Architect, from the other architects is a clear understanding of how each project is about more than designing an exceptional space. Each project has the capacity to enhance people’s lives and lifestyles, and this small firm is dedicated to doing exactly that. READ MORE

CHAPEL HILL MAGAZINE: “Lake Living”

January 18, 2022 § Leave a comment

by Morgan Cartier Weston | Photos by John Michael Simpson

TO READ THE ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 EDITON, CLICK BELOW AND GO TO PAGE 57

ARCHINECT: “Wolf-Huang Lake House”

October 27, 2021 § Leave a comment

PHOTOS BY TZU CHEN
Living/Dining/Kitchen space

Across the east fork of the Eno River in Orange County, six miles north of downtown Hillsborough, Lake Orange has attracted well-heeled homeowners to its shores for years, many of whom have built their very large, very traditional dream homes there. Many hardwoods and evergreen trees have disappeared in their wake.

Now another new home has appeared along the lake’s shore, nestled among the lofty trees, that is the antithesis of those houses. Designed by Chapel Hill architect Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA, the Wolf-Huang house has introduced modern, sensibly sized, and environmentally sustainable living to the Lake Orange neighborhood. Inside, it is the essence of minimal, reductive design — simple and serene. READ MORE

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN: “Design Lab – Baboolal Residence”

April 12, 2021 § Leave a comment

Front elevation. (Photos © Tzu Chen)
Rear elevation: “At the Baboolal House by Arielle Condoret Schechter, family hangouts on the deck overlooking the neighbor’s meadow are what restore the spirit.” ~ RD

By Claire Conroy, editor

Yes, there are custom residential projects where money truly is no object, but those are the exceptions to the rule. Unless your clients are bitcoin billionaires, there’s a limit to how much they can or will spend on their house.

Architect Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA, understands this acutely. Her clients in North Carolina’s Research Triangle are ordinary people tired of their ordinary houses, and they trust her to keep their best interests at heart. That drives her to seek out value at every turn on her projects, trying to hit that perfect balance of budget, sustainability, livability, and delight. ..READ MORE

PROPANE.com: “Harsh Riverfront Site Inspires Spectacular Net Zero Home”

July 28, 2020 § Leave a comment

1.Haw River House drone view copy 2

Greywater collection, renewable energy, and a propane generator keep this Haw River dwelling resilient and self-sustaining. Photos by Tzu Chen

When architect Arielle Condoret Schechter’s clients purchased the dazzling 21-acre strip of land that would become their home on the Haw River in North Carolina, the seller had a simple condition: He wanted them to build a home that was environmentally responsible.

The buyers granted his wish by hiring Schechter, a residential architect known for building net zero or passive houses with an ultramodern aesthetic. And his directive became the first of many ways the land would dictate Schechter’s design for the Haw River House.

“It is just spectacular out there,” Schechter says. “It’s like nothing I’ve ever had a chance to work on as far as primal beauty goes.” READ MORE

4.Haw River_view from the river at dusk copy 2

The Paradis-Zimmerman house overlooks the Haw River rapids from its perch on a rocky knoll surrounded by a forest.

ARCHITECTS + ARTISANS: “Six Winners in the Matsumoto Competition”

July 26, 2020 § Leave a comment

1.Haw River House drone view copy 2

By Micheal Welton (Photo by Tzu Chen)

It couldn’t have happened to a nicer place.

The top two winners in the 2020 Matsumoto Prize competition – for both juried and people’s choice awards – are sited on one of Carolina’s most sought-after beaches…

…Second place in the juried competition went to Arielle C. Schechter’s Haw River House. “‘It’s just enough house for the site,’ was one of the comments,” he says. Third place went to Haymond House, by Tonic Design’s Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan… READ MORE

 

AEC CAFE: “Haw River Net Zero Passive House in Chatham County, North Carolina, by Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA”

June 12, 2020 § Leave a comment

By Sanjay Gangal 

The clients — an artist and an attorney — asked for a “very sustainable yet super-modern” house for their blended family, which is generously populated with children and beloved dogs. And they wanted the type of house that Arielle Condoret Schechter is known for: modern, Net Zero, Passive house-rated with clean lines and clear volumes and open, uncluttered interior spaces filled with sunlight, panoramic views, and easy access to the outdoors.

4.Haw River_view from the river at dusk copy 2

PHOTO © TZU CHEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Perched on a knoll above the Haw River rapids in Chatham County, the 2600-square-foot house was designed to be perfectly at home within its wooded site. READ MORE

 

AECCafe.com: “Haw River Net Zero Passive House in Chatham County, North Carolina by Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA”

June 11, 2020 § Leave a comment

by Sanjay Gangal | photos by Tzu Chen Photography

The clients, an artist and an attorney, asked for a “very sustainable yet super-modern” house for their blended family, which is generously populated with children and beloved dogs. And they wanted the type of house that Arielle Condoret Schechter is known for: modern, Net Zero, Passive house-rated with clean lines and clear volumes and open, uncluttered interior spaces filled with sunlight, panoramic views, and easy access to the outdoors.

4.Haw River_view from the river at dusk copy 2

  • Architect: Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA
  • Project: Haw River Net Zero Passive House
  • Location: Chatham County, North Carolina
  • Photography: Tzu Chen Photography
  • Owners: Kate Paradis and Scott Zimmerman
  • Completed: 2019
  • Software used: ARCHICAD by Graphisoft    READ MORE

 

GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN – Architect To Watch series: “Arielle Schechter on How Japan Inspires Her Design Philosophy”

June 6, 2020 § 1 Comment

ACS by her fireplace_cropped

This architect builds for the North Carolina climate and for clients who crave sustainability.

By Jessica Mordaco

Light is the most important factor in architect Arielle Schechter’s design philosophy. Much of her design inspiration comes from Japanese architects who use screens and overhangs to block the sun while creating a seamless translucence from outdoors to indoors—that, and modernist design that connects inside spaces to nature. Schechter became interested in her craft at a young age, growing up with a famous mid-century architect as a father. “I always thought I’d work for him but, when he died, I had a lot of things I wanted to say in architecture,” she says. “I totally believe there’s no point in designing anything, much less a green building unless you’re going to make it wonderful for the people who live in it, too.”

“I really don’t care how much money I make. I just want to get people to stop buying cookie-cutter, badly built developer houses that don’t have an architect involved because they’re inefficient.” ~ Arielle Schechter

READ MORE…

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