HOME BUILDER DIGEST: “The Best Residential Architects in [the Triangle]”

April 5, 2021 § Leave a comment

Arielle Condoret Schechter, Architect

440 Bayberry Dr., Chapel Hill, NC 27517

Arielle Schechter, a registered architect recognized by the A.I.A., has made a name for herself in the Triangle area for her nationally recognized custom houses, Micropolis micro-houses, and mid century renovations. She is currently based in Chapel Hill. For over 26 years, she has specialized in warm, energy-efficient, and modernist residential architecture, including cutting-edge Net-Zero design and passive house construction… READ MORE 

THE AWARD-WINNING, NET ZERO HAW RIVER HOUSE AT DUSK. Photo by Tzu Chen

e-ARCHITECT: “Baboolal Residence, Chapel Hill, NC”

February 11, 2021 § Leave a comment

(Photos by Tzu Chen)

e-Architect is published in Glasgow, Scotland

The Baboolal Residence is a net zero house for a multicultural family of four. The husband is Indian originally from South Africa and the wife is American. They are both in high stress professions: he is a pediatric anesthesiologist and she is a pediatric nurse. They have two small children and pets. READ MORE

CONTEMPORIST: “A Roof Covered In Solar Panels Allowed This Home To Be A Net-Zero Energy House”

January 8, 2021 § Leave a comment

From the editors: Architect Arielle Schechter has shared her latest project with us, the ‘Baboolal Residence’, which is surrounded by forest and a grassy meadow, and is located near the town of Chapel Hill in North Carolina.

(Photos by Tzu Chen)

Designed as a net-zero house for a family of four, the home features a unique roof shape that allows for the inclusion of solar panels. READ MORE

GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN: “Architect to Watch — Arielle Schechter on How Japan Inspires Her Design Philosophy”

December 2, 2020 § Leave a comment

This architect builds for the North Carolina climate and for clients who crave sustainability.

By Jessica Mordaco

Light is the most important factor in architect Arielle Schechter’s design philosophy. Much of her design inspiration comes from Japanese architects who use screens and overhangs to block the sun while creating a seamless translucence from outdoors to indoors—that, and modernist design that connects inside spaces to nature. Schechter became interested in her craft at a young age, growing up with a famous mid-century architect as a father. “I always thought I’d work for him but, when he died, I had a lot of things I wanted to say in architecture,” she says. “I totally believe there’s no point in designing anything, much less a green building unless you’re going to make it wonderful for the people who live in it, too.”  READ MORE

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